Challenges Facing The Health Care Industry

1887 Words8 Pages
This case study provides the challenges facing the health care industry in details and proposes plausible solutions to the arising issues. The paper focuses specifically on three major challenges: the shortage of labor force for the physician extenders (nurses, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants), lack of primary health care due to overspecialization of the physician workforce, and cybersecurity. The healthcare system makes provision for the prevention, treatment, and management of illness and the preservation of mental and physical well-being of patients through services offered by the medical, nursing, and allied health professions. In this recent age two major debates have defined the U.S. healthcare system: provision and…show more content…
healthcare system and the critical issues confronting healthcare professionals as they struggle to combine science, information and compassion. With the implementation of the affordable care act (ACA) in March 2010. There was an expectation to revolutionize the U.S. health care system. The expectation was to make the health care more affordable to everyone. In doing this unexpected challenges to the health care system providers arose. When the newly insured were provided with health care coverage many of the newly insured try to use their health benefits. Health care providers reported higher than expected use of oncology, maternity, musculoskeletal and other specialty services, from the newly insured. As the population of health care users grew in size after the ACA the health care labor force did not grow appropriately to accommodate such drastic changes in the frequent usage of health care facilities by the newly insured. According to the “Health Care Worker Shortage: Suggested Responses from the Surgical Community” by Jeanette and Andrew, the demand for healthcare professionals was predicted to grow about 25% between 2002 and 2010. Registered nurses (RNs), the largest healthcare professional group in the U.S., were particularly in demand. Of the 2.7 million RNs registered in 2002, only 10% were less than 30 years of age, and the average age, 45 years old according to 2002 data, had been increasingly steadily. The number of new entrants into the
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