Challenges to Vietnam's State Capacity

2219 Words Sep 3rd, 2011 9 Pages
THREE MAJOR CHALLENGES TO STATE CAPACITY
FACED BY VIETNAM OVER THE LAST DECADE

State-building is an enduring process dating back from the 13th century. Since the emergence of modern states, there has never been a smooth and flat road for states’ development. States, ranging from strong to weak or from rich to poor, all have difficulties in every step of the progress. However, different states with a different history, society and nature will have to face up to different challenges, especially the challenges to state capacity which is a fundamental element of maintaining a state. Vietnam is not an exception. Being a developing country, the challenges to Vietnam’s state capacity are understandably numerous. Among those varied
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Firstly, it challenges the state capacity in ensuring equality among the whole society. In most cases of corruption, wealth is concentrated in the hands of a minority of population as money and properties go to the pockets of those who have power and position. Vice versa, good positions and promotions are given to those who have money instead of genuine ability. The burden of corruption falls on the poor since they are not able to afford the bribes to get good education, health care and other services (Myint 2000). Secondly, corruption, by creating inequality within the society also reduces the legitimacy of the government in the eyes of its citizens. A government which is seriously corrupted is hardly able to implement laws and policies efficiently. Moreover, the capacity of the state to invest in national projects is also diminished because of serious losses of revenues caused by corruption. Businesses and companies in Vietnam pay bribes to get reduction of taxes, fees, dues, custom duties and public utility charges such as for water and electricity (Myint, 49). Thus, in direct or indirect ways, corruption is still a great challenge to the state capacity of Vietnam that both the government and citizens are for years trying to find a resolution.

Secondly, apart from corruption which is a challenge emerges within the state,
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