Chapter I Introduction 1) Introduction 2) Fly ash an overview 3) Classification of fly

2700 WordsApr 23, 201911 Pages
Chapter I Introduction 1) Introduction 2) Fly ash an overview 3) Classification of fly ash 4) Impact of fly ash on environment 5) Remedies 6) Uses of fly ash 7) Strength of flyash 8) Stabilization of flyash 9) Lime an overview 10) Issue for the millennium INTRODUCTION Disposal of residual waste is one of the greatest challenges faced by the manufacturing industries in India.The waste products which are produced from these industries are generally toxic in nature, are easily ignitable and corrosive orare reactive easily and thereforecause detrimental effects on the environment. Thus disposal of these wastes properly is one of the major concernsto be dealt with in the present generation. An innovative solution which would be…show more content…
In many countries, including India, coal is used as a primary fuel in thermalpower stations and in other industries. Four of the countries, namely, China, India, Poland, and the United States, together produce more than 270 million tons of fly ash every year and less than half of it is used. The coal reserve of India is approximately 200 billion tonnes and its annual production reaches 250 million tones approximately. Unlike the developed countries, in India, the ash content present in the coal which is used for power generation is about 30-40%. The generation of ash has increased to about 131 million tonne during 2010-11 and is expected to grow further. The fine residue produced from the burnt coal is carried in the fluegas, separated by electrostatic precipitators, and collected in a field of hoppers. This residue which is collected is called as fly ash and is considered to be an industrial waste which can be used in the construction industry.Fly ash is one of the major industrial wastes used as a construction material. The fly ash can either be disposed of in thedry form or else the wet method in which it can also be mixed with water and discharged as slurry into locations called ash ponds. Issues for the Millennium As per the current records, ash generation in India is approximately 112 million metric tons and its present utilization is only about 42 million metric tons (38% of ash generated). Rest of the unutilized ash is forced to

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