Character Analysis Of Stewie

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Having finished Meg’s characterisation, I moved on to Stewie. For this analysis, I took Culpeper’s (2001) self-characterisation and the implicit cues, as well as appraisal theory (Eggins & Slade 1997, Martin & White 2005). Here, I firstly analysed how he portrays himself as a homosexual and as a baby. For the first one, I took the example of when he kisses Brian so as to be expelled from the army and says I am so gay with my gayness. For the second one, I looked at when he says I’m learning to use the toilet, I’m learning what shapes are. I spent half an hour laughing at my own feet yesterday.
Then, I focused on some implicit cues. Words and expressions like I’ve been forced to suffer or matriarchal tyranny led me to consider how much Stewie hates his mother, up to the point of killing her. As a consequence of the above-mentioned words and expressions, it can be stated that Stewie is seen as an anti-hero.
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On the one hand, when meeting Susie, Joe’s daughter, for the first time, he refers to her as an angel. The fact that he calls a girl angel can imply that Stewie is heterosexual because of a possible attraction towards her. Moreover, he also says that she is so hot, which reinforces his heterosexuality. Nevertheless, in several episodes, it is shown that he may be homosexual, as when other men call him Desiree. The reason why they call him Desiree is because Stewie is disguised as a woman and this is ‘his’ name. In other words, Desiree is Stewie’s alter ego. So, that demonstrated me that Stewie really likes transvestism. His homosexuality is reinforced by his relationship with his teddy bear, Rupert. I noticed that he could be attracted to Rupert because in one scene he says I’m ready to get off the pill. I think we should start

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