Character Analysis Of Willy Loman

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In order to further enforce the truth about the reality of the American dream, Miller describes Willy Loman’s character as someone who clings to the idea that America will provide its promise of riches and contentment applies to those who are both well-liked, hardworking individuals. Willy Loman believes that the pinnacle of the American dream has a highly developed and vast social network. He perceives it as a sign of a successful businessman and often reflects this belief to his family. According to Miller, Loman marvels at how much opportunity America appears to present socially and he thrives on the benefits this falsified dream can do for his family. Willy states, “the wonder of this country, that a man can end with diamonds here [in America] on the basis of being liked!” (259). Here the author sets up Willy’s understanding of social standards. It establishes Willy Loman’s ideology of the American dream, which currently consists of social stature. Since Loman sees social stature as a powerful tool in success, he yearns for it in his own life, and more importantly his family’s lives as well. Willy admits to this belief when he gets fired from his job. Here, Willy states, “I guess I always felt that if a man was impressive, and well liked, that nothing—“(265). Willy presents himself as a character who believes in America’s dream of achieving high social stature based on being well-liked. Miller makes it a point to emphasize this ideology to establish it as a trait in

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