Children Of Immigrants In The US

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The American cultural fabric is ever changing; there is a reason the US is called a melting pot. According to the US Census Bureau, by 2023 more than one in seven US residents will by foreign-born - a statistic that does not account for children of immigrants born in the US. It should be noted that new Americans arrive every day. Given current trends, it is estimated that by 2060, one in five American residents will be foreign born. Such growth rates cannot be ignored. US public schools are going to see this demographic shift first-hand. Not only is the country experiencing an unprecedented wave of immigration, this new wave brings forth many changes atypical of the immigration story so far. There is a difference between the past 40 years…show more content…
In another article published in The Future of Children, a cycle was identified in access to healthcare. The study concluded that childhood health is a good indicator a child’s socioeconomic status later in life - and found that immigrant children were more likely to have inadequate health care growing up. Health is not limited to trips to the hospital. 3rd generation Americans are statistically more likely to abuse alcohol and drugs than their 1st generation counterparts. They are also more likely to attempt suicide. This highlights the fact that immigrant families are not passing higher socioeconomic status to their offspring. It also suggests that children unable to make the most of what American culture has to offer, and are instead being exposed (or subjected) to the worst parts of American society: addiction and…show more content…
Schools can be the “door” to the American system for many families, as it is the bureaucratic institution that nearly everyone is familiar with. Providing assistance to immigrant children, and helping direct them to existing resources, will better ensure those resources are being used for their purpose. Assisting students with access is important - in other words, a school should facilitate a student’s college search process, making all of the options clear and helping them find scholarships and navigate financial aid. Apart from issues that seem unique to immigrant families, these students face many of the same problems so many other children in the US are facing. Poverty, home-life, and the family value of education all have a tremendous impact on a child’s learning. By fostering a welcoming environment for new families, a school is in a better position to make a positive change in an immigrant child’s
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