Children Of Inter Parental Family Violence

1087 Words5 Pages
Every single day, a child encounters an act of violence. Not only on televisions but also in their own homes as well. For those who go through those circumstances strongly believe that even families and homes are not the shelters where they would find encouragement and sense of security, but rather they abstract the meaning as an arena where fear, anxiety, confusion, anger, and disruption are significant threads in the needlepoint of a home life,"(Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Nursing, 2015, pp. 97-108). A home is supposed to be a safe place where children start learning the essentials and importance of bonding of relationships. It’s a place, where children learn how to love and relate to others and start building of their…show more content…
As a matter of concerns, the demand arises, how does exposure to inter-parental violence and childhood physical and emotional abuse cause physical aggressions in any undergraduate student. To look more closely, one must consider the results of earlier investigative results by various psychiatrists describing the root cause and their possible primitives’ measures.
Why do so many children exposed to intimate partner violence struggle with emotional and behavioral problems and become victims or perpetrators of violence in their own relationships? Although multiple processes undoubtedly are involved, the subjective meaning that children draw from hostile and aggressive interactions in the family is proposed to be a critical factor in shaping its immediate and long-term impact on them (Fosco et al., 2007; Grych 2000; Grych and Fincham 1990). The cognitive-contextual framework (Grych and Fincham 1990; Grych et al. 1992) holds that when children witness aggression between their caregivers, they actively process and try to make sense of what is happening, and that their appraisals have implications for their immediate response in the situation and their long-term functioning. More specifically, it proposes that children appraise the degree of threat the interaction poses to them or their families, why it is occurring, and how they should respond. Appraisals involve emotion as well as cognition (e.g.,
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