Children Who Suffer With Learning Disabilities

1138 WordsSep 2, 20165 Pages
Children who suffer with learning disabilities struggle with communicating not only at school, but even within their very own family. The desired lifesaving cure may not exist yet, but with the help of a community, a child can develop the imperative skills he or she desperately needs to become literate. Literacy means to be able to participate in a society. It does not matter if someone’s language is perfect without a grammatical error in sight or if their language is filled with insufficient mistakes. All that matters is if a person is capable of understanding the other’s main concept. I recently learned this eye-opening lesson about literacy from my three year old cousin battling with a recent diagnosis of autism. I remember the day she was born. Everyone cheered when it was announced that there was a beautiful baby girl being added to the family. We had all been so anxious to find out because her parents had everyone suffering with them as they waited nine long months for the big reveal. After waiting what felt like forever, April and Jacob finally decided on a name. Our new family member was Blakely Ann Hickman. In that moment, we were all bubbling with joy because we thought this baby was born without a scratch on her health record. In our eyes, she was already perfect. However, two years passed and she still hadn 't said her first word. Ordinarily, babies start to at least attempt to talk somewhere between an advanced six months and normality of two years. This
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