China

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BUSINESS ETIQUETTES Making appointments : Being late for an appointment is considered a serious insult in Chinese business culture. The East Asia & Pacific office of the U.S. Department of Commerce can help you in arranging appointments with local Chinese business and government officials, and can identify the contacts you will have to establish to achieve your objectives. The services of a host of a reputable Public Relations firm is recommended for detailed work involving meeting and negotiating with senior Chinese officials or even pinpointing whom you should meet for your purposes. The best times for scheduling appointments are April to June and September to October. Business and government hours are 8:00 a.m. to 5:00…show more content…
You may make general inquiries about the health of another's family, such as 'are all in your family well?' During a meal, expressing enthusiasm about the food you are eating is a welcome, and usually expected, topic of conversation. There is no need to avoid mentioning Taiwan. If the subject comes up, never refer to this island as 'The Republic of China' or 'Nationalist China.' The correct term is 'Taiwan Province', or just 'Taiwan.' 'Small talk' is considered especially important at the beginning of a meeting; any of the topics suggested in the next set of points will be appropriate for this occasion. Welcome Topics of Conversation Chinese scenery, landmarks weather, climate, and geography in China your travels in other countries your positive experiences traveling in China Chinese art Topics to Avoid Refrain from using the terms such as 'Red China', 'Mainland China,' and 'Communist China.' Just say 'China.' First Name or Title? Addressing others with respect Chinese names appear in a different order than Western names. Each person has, in this order, a family, generational, and first name. Generational and given names can be separated by a space or a hyphen, but are frequently written as one word. The generational designation is usually the first word of a two-worded first name. This is still popular in some families, especially among the southerners and the overseas Chinese from the south. Most

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