Church History Paper I

1551 Words Nov 24th, 2012 7 Pages
The Foundation of Orthodoxy and the Cannon

A Paper
Presented to Dr. Keith Goad of
Liberty University
Lynchburg, VA

In Partial Fulfillment
Of the Requirements for
Church History
CHHI 301

By
Brittany N. Askew
February 6, 2012

Brittany Askew
06 February 2012
CHHI301_B04
Paper 1
Introduction
The process by which Scripture has been preserved and compiled is one whose history is worth noting. The early church had many opportunities to share the Good News of Christ via word of mouth, but from the time of Christ’s resurrection until the mid-second century, there had not been a single culmination of writings considered to be essential for the purposes of
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Marcion believed that the Jewish Scriptures only concerned the covenant between God and the Jews of Israel, and therefore was no longer valid for the Christian church. In his mind, these were two very separate Gods. When noticing that several of Paul’s writings made mention of the God of Israel, Marcion claimed that those writings were not Paul’s original texts, and should be considered counterfeit. Marcion’s views of Paul’s “forged” portions of his letters can be attributed to what many theologians today might call the Slippery Slope Argument. In this case, Marcion chose not to trust in the inerrancy of what God had spoken to Paul. Paul’s writing’s were flawed, or someone must have tampered with them. This lack of trust in inerrancy would ultimately allow Marcion to fall down a “slippery slope”, giving way to forsake other important Christian foundational truths.
As his ideologies became more widespread, it became obvious that Marcion’s views on creation were radically reinterpreted (or misinterpreted, better yet), as well as his opinions on the doctrines of incarnation and the resurrection. Ultimately, the church at large came to the conclusion that his doctrines contradicted several fundamental points in Christian doctrine. It forced the church to make a case for the value and status of the Jewish scriptures it had adopted as its own, and it prompted