City of God Review

2043 Words9 Pages
October 10, 2010 St. Augustine’s work, The City of God, portrays the Roman virtue and describes it’s affect on the manners of the Romans. Though the people did not worship God, St. Augustine points out that God still blessed them by increasing their dominion. In this text, Augustine finds many aspects of the ethos Roman Empire both admirable and problematic. He does this in a way that gives the reader a better understanding on his views of how to live a life dedicated to God. He also shows the problems of living for other men rather than living for the righteousness of God. Augustine speaks of the manners of the ancient Romans, and shows in what sense it was due to the virtue of the Romans themselves, and in how far to the counsel of…show more content…
This shows the greatness with being pure in all ways and waiting for the good things in life and not being greedy. I really think this is Augustine way to show respect towards the pure and admire what they have done for God. In “To What Profit the Romans Carried on Wars, and How Much They Contributed to the Well-Being of Those Whom They Conquered,” Augustine wrote that humans, because mortal and are only on earth for so long, shouldn 't be concerned over "whose government a dying man lives, if they who govern do not force him to impiety and iniquity?" The Romans tried to impose laws and regulations on nations they took over but they themselves did not live by these. If everyone was under the Roman Empire, than everyone in that empire should have the same privileges and rights. It does no good, according to Augustine, to do this. "Take away outward show, and what are all men after all but men? But even though the perversity of the age should permit that all the better men should be more highly honored than others, neither thus should human honor be held at a great price, for it is smoke which has no weight." Men that may not seem as if they have accomplished much greatness in the eyes of other men may have done just the opposite. "...the citizens of so great a country may not seem to themselves to have done anything very great, if, in order to obtain it, they have done some good works or endured some evils, when those men
Get Access