Climate Change And Its Effect On The Environment

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Introduction The past two decades has see the largest push for the creation renewable energy technologies in order to reduce the anthropogenic carbon emissions, that have risen so quickly since the industrial revolution began in the early 19th century. The common use of cars, the expansion of commercial farming and the large use of everyday use of fossil fuels such as coal, oil and gas have all contributed to the rising levels of green house gasses. Carbon dioxide levels have increased by around 38% and methane levels have increased by 148% (Earthobservatory.nasa.gov, n.d.) both carbon dioxide and methane are considered to be green house gasses. The warming of the earth’s climate has gone hand in hand with the rising green house gas…show more content…
In renewable technologies such as wind turbines the most prominent REEs are neodymium (Nd), Praseodymium (Pr) and dysprosium (Dy). Most studies done so far have shown that the primary supply of on land mining of these REEs is unable to keep up with the demand that has been projected for renewables by 2015. This essay looks at whether the detrimental effect of mining these Rare Earth Elements is worth the detrimental effect that it is going cause to the environment especially that of the deep oceans, and whether it is a cost effective way to generate an alternative to fossil fuel energy. Driver Climate change has started the effort to create high-powered technologies that the population is now so used to, but using sources that produce zero carbon emissions. These renewable energy sources include wind turbines, solar panels and wave energy technologies all of which provide households and industries electricity that is so important to modern day life. It has also pushed for electric, hybrid and hydrogen powered vehicles, all in a bid to reduce the pollution that is being so abundantly produced. Scotland is abundant in the natural resources need to create efficient renewable energies. These are mainly in the form of on land wind farms closely followed by off shore wind farms, but it is also very involved in designing efficient wave and tidal energy forms. The majority of Scotland is rural in its landscape meaning that in a lot of areas the only
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