Cognitive Behavioral Therapy ( Cbt )

1697 WordsMar 15, 20157 Pages
Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is one therapeutic approach that is capable of providing this group with effective psychotherapeutic treatment and interventions as well as approaches that enhances the effectiveness and efficiency of group therapy. Often developed for skills training, cognitive-behavioral groups are characterized by the use of practical interventions focused on behavior modification techniques (Wilson, Bouffard, and Mackenzie; 2005). The therapeutic goal of cognitive behavioral therapy in a group setting is to educate group members on how to define or establish the assessment of their behaviors from those of themselves, namely, from their being and their reality (Corey, 2004). Therefore, one of the major tasks of this group’s leader would be to help group members to alter their emotions and actions in order to develop healthier thoughts that can guide members to accept themselves unconditionally. According to Yalom and Leszcz (2005), CBT can be applied in group therapy for various clinical conditions such as acute and chronic depression, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and panic disorder. Group cognitive behavioral therapy (GCBT) is a form of psychotherapy that is based upon the principles of behaviorism and cognitive psychology that combines aspects of three different therapeutic types: cognitive therapy, behavioral therapy, and group therapy (Rose, 1989). These group sessions should utilize cognitive restructuring for changing negative thoughts,
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