Cognitive Psychology Definition Paper

1387 Words Sep 25th, 2011 6 Pages
Cognitive Psychology Definition Paper
Randy Strickland
University of Phoenix
PSY/360
Dione Johnson
July 111, 2011

Cognitive Psychology Definition Paper
Introduction
Cognition is the “science” term for "the process of thought.” Its usage varies in different ways in accordance with different disciplines: For example, in psychology and cognitive science, it refers to an information processing view of an individual's psychological makeup. It addresses the questions of how psychological/cognitive functions are produced by the neural circuitry. Cognitive psychology is the bases for most learning theories today, so it has made its mark to never be erased. This work would emphasize its impact and show its relevance, so consider the
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Since 1970, “more than sixty universities in North America and Europe have established cognitive psychology programs” (Hothersall, 2005, p. 267). Jean Piaget is the man behind this perspective in which how the brain processes, stores, and retrieves experiences is what the base of this perspective is built upon. Compared to a computer, the brain has intricate ways of storing and retrieving information was first illustrated by Piaget. Cognitive psychology received another push by social psychology concepts such as Fishbein and Ajzen advocated which says that our behavior roughly equals our behavioral intentions. They go on to say that our behavioral intentions equal our weighted attitudes plus our weighted social norms” (Ajzen, & Fishbein, 1980). Karl Spencer Lashley was born on June 7, 1890 and died on August 7, 1953. He was born in West Virginia on a farm. Lashley conducted many maze experiments with rats. With these experiments, he proved that maze learning was not localized to “any particular area of the cortex” (Goodwin, 2008, p. 96). Lashley is responsible for discovering that the cortex operates as a system. He proclaimed that it is characterized by equipotentiality and mass action. Equipotentiality, according to Lashley, is that if a portion of the brain is destroyed, another part of the brain will adapt and serve the same function, but only to a certain degree. This
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