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College Admissions Essay: What I Learned In High School

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Imagine me -- a hotshot 14 year old, destined for the Ivy leagues, captain of the JV wrestling squad (weighing in at an impressive 5'3", 115 pounds), and an overall smart alec strolling into high school as if it owed me something. Failure was not a part of my claimed impressive and nothing could stop me from being top of my class (spoiler if you haven't looked at the rest of my application: I'm not).

They'd tell me, despite all my prior success slacking off in middle school, that "high school is a whole new ballgame" and that "I better buckle down" if I wanted to be successful. "But adults, what do they know!", I'd exclaim. As I've gone on to learn, oftentimes what they share has a lot more to teach than any growing and maturing child could
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My lack of motivation or desire to achieve anything in such a "useless" class handed me my first ever D, a D- at that, and shocked me dearly. Me? Oh, but I was destined for Harvard, for MIT, I was the boy genius that colleges would shower with money to have the pleasure of my attendance! My fragile, immature ego couldn't take the blow, and for a long time my stubbornness affected me in mathematics by telling myself "you're just no good at math, there's no way you can hope for…show more content…
As I progressed through my education, my habits slowly improved, eventually earning myself mediocre grades in mathematics and the sciences, which unbeknownst to past me, were heavily mathematically based. By the end of junior year I began to realize the true importance of everything I learned, despite it's perceived relevance at the time. The peak of my efforts culminated in a otherwise fairly average achievement -- a 3 on the AP Physics exam. To some, perhaps even a disappointment -- to me, the smart alec who's eyes were forced wide open to a world that is not forgiving to the lazy, it meant everything. The concepts and mathematics of Physics relied heavily on both knowledge and application of algebra, calculus, and geometrical ideas -- subjects I subjected myself to struggle in. In an attempt to prove to myself that I had the knowledge and mastery of these ideas, a course that was designed to incorporate them all was a true litmus test of my abilities and how far they had progressed to earn myself something only I may be proud
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