Communication Skills Gen Y Workforce

2906 Words Oct 14th, 2012 12 Pages
rP os t www.hbr.org HBR CASE STUDY

Gen Y in the
Workforce

op yo How ca n Sarah and
Josh work together m ore effectively?

by Tamara J. Erickson

Do

No

tC



Reprint R0902X
This document is authorized for use only by sharmila mohapatra until January 2012. Copying or posting is an infringement of copyright. Permissions@hbsp.harvard.edu or 617.783.7860.

HBR CASE STUDY

rP os t

How I learned to love millennials (and stop worrying about what they were doing with their iPhones).

op yo Gen Y in the Workforce

tC
“RU BRD?”1

The text message from Ashok stood out in bold block letters on the small screen of Josh Lewis’s iPhone. Am I ever, Josh thought, stuffing the device back into his
…show more content…
They’re well suited to handle the traffic—much better than we are,” Josh replied. These days it was just so much easier to download music, movies, and TV shows how and when you wanted them. To have, as Jessica joked, old 90210 and new 90210 existing peacefully on your laptop. “We’d be leveraging one of Rising Entertainment’s biggest strengths, its library, in a way that gets the company out in front of the movement to free content.”
“All great points,” Sarah had responded. “But our budget is soft right now—everything is soft right now. I’m not sure we have the time and resources to throw at these channels.” Josh opened his mouth to respond, but the marketing chief cut off the discussion there and went on to her other notes.
That was the end of that, Josh explained to his friends. “I guess I just expected that I would get to act on more of my ideas,” he complained, as they finished crunching through a large order of lime-cilantro chips and salsa.
“And that the higher-ups here would have figured out by now that the model’s changing.”
By the time Ashok, Jessica, and Josh had gotten down to salty crumbs, the three were in firm agreement: Sarah just didn’t get it.

op yo ment and opportunity—ever-present TV and film shoots on the lots, hobnobbing with industry power brokers, the inevitable offers from competing studios, and, of course, the terrific
LA nightlife. But now, with 10 months on the job, and most of that time relegated to
Open Document