Comparative Summary on “the Corporate Politics of Sign Values” by Goldman and Papson and “Media in the Mediated Marketplace” by Leiss Et Al.

804 Words4 Pages
Comparative Summary on “The Corporate Politics of Sign Values” by Goldman and Papson and “Media in the Mediated Marketplace” by Leiss et al.

The chapter titled “The Corporate Politics of Sign Values” by Goldman and Papson (1996) and the chapter titled “Media in the Mediated Marketplace” by Leiss et al. (2005) both discuss how corporations and their advertising agencies attempt to better target consumers and sustain their interest toward advertisements. Goldman and Papson discuss how “corporate advertising” (1996: 216) and “legitimation ads” (1996: pg. 217) are used for this purpose while Leiss et al. (2005) discuss how various media and media institutions also work towards this purpose. Although the authors appear to focus on different
…show more content…
The authors explain that many online ads have become less in-your-face and instead more interactive, fun, and relative to socially significant issues. For instance, there may be an ad in the form of an animated character who

will allow the user to type in a command so that the character will execute a particular move, or an ad that promises that its company will plant a tree if a certain number of visitors click on it (Leiss et al., 2005). In addition, many companies have attempted to maximize consumer appeal by “[carving] out new niches in the media marketplace” (Leiss et al., 2005: 334) through technologies such as online oneto-one marketing systems and cable and satellite television. While Leiss et al. explain the technicalities of niching, Goldman and Papson explain how many citizens now equate technological and economic progress with business and how many citizens now believe that business has resulted in more choices, greater quality/performance, and greater “growth opportunities” (1996: 246). Niche markets, technological advancement, and growth opportunities are closely associated with the notion of “going global” (1996: 246), as Goldman and Papson put it. The authors explain how many advertisements are working to project an image of diversity, global integration, and an eventual

    More about Comparative Summary on “the Corporate Politics of Sign Values” by Goldman and Papson and “Media in the Mediated Marketplace” by Leiss Et Al.

      Get Access