Compare/Contrast: "A Good Man Is Hard to Find" with "Hills Like White Elephants"

917 WordsNov 16, 20054 Pages
Compare/Contrast: "Good Man" with "Hills" Currently, a plethora of outstanding stories have been written. What makes a story, though? The answer is the elements that the author includes into his or her writing, such as symbolism and imagery. "Hills like White Elephants," written by Ernest Hemingway, and "A Good Man is Hard to Find," written by Flannery O'Connor, are just two examples of admirable work. Each writer incorporated plenty of elements to improve the story. Since the amount of elements is limited, these two writers exploited several of the same ones. Although the stories have numerous resemblances, they are also remarkably different. Various similarities arise in these two pieces of writing. In both, a main…show more content…
For example, O'Connor uses things like "five or six graves fenced in the middle" and "a big black battered hearse-like automobile" to symbolize the death that awaits the family. She also includes characters to symbolize higher beings, such as the devil and Jesus. The symbolism that Flannery adds in displays the meaning to the story. This is parallel to the symbolism that occurs in "Hills like White Elephants." In this instance, Hemingway relies on the use of symbolism to carry his theme. When Ernest shows the hills as "brown and dry" or as "lovely green," he portrays the outcome of each choice. The audience, in turn, realizes this, and then sees how greed can cause terrible consequences. These two stories can be seen as closely resembling the other, but they possess countless distinctions as well. Both authors applied some of the same elements into their stories. However, the style of writing is unmistakably different. In "Hills like White Elephants," Hemingway provides the reader with little detail. At times, it is difficult to comprehend what the characters are discussing because the most information supplied is about an operation. Even then, the reader may have trouble understanding the plot. Because of Hemingway's vague style, much analysis and interpretation is brought about, giving the story an extraordinary twist. On the other hand, O'Connor writes with an inverted method. She provides an abundance of details to the
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