Compare and Contrast Auden’s and Faulks’ Use of Detail Establish a Feeling of Alienation in ‘Refugee Blues’ and ‘the Last Night’

1043 Words Oct 24th, 2012 5 Pages
Compare and contrast Auden’s and Faulks’ use of detail establish a feeling of alienation in ‘Refugee Blues’ and ‘The Last Night’

Both Sebastian Faulks and W. H. Auden write about the tales of Jewish refugees living in the time of holocaust during WW2 in their two pieces, ‘The Last Night’ and ‘Refugee Blues’. By using literary techniques such as imagery and tone both writers, Auden and Gray create a sense of alienation for the characters portrayed in their writing. Both Auden and Gray create a sincere illusion of reality to promote the refugee’s alienation and suffering in both stories ultimately bringing the two gripping tales to life.
Both Auden and Faulks use imagery as an extremely strong literary device to create alienation
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"Say this city has ten million souls, some are living in mansions, some are living in holes". The rhythm created throughout provokes a melancholy atmosphere to be interpreted by the reader enticing compassion towards the refugees and further discriminating and separating the Jewish characters and their race from the rest of the world. Unlike Gray, Faulks writes the ‘The Last Night’ in the form of a historical fiction indicating the lack of a particular rhythm in which the story can be read. These contrasting rhythms though seem to create to same feeling of sadness and empathy towards the characters. Faulk’s choice of diction and literary techniques match with the rhythm and tone of ‘Refugee Blues’ and create a huge similarity between the way the two poems are written to create alienation towards the refugees.
Auden and Faulks use foreshadowing both subtly and palpably early on in each text to show what will happen in the near future of the two stories. Faulks in particular manipulates this technique to show upcoming events. In the opening statement “Andre and his brother Jacob… to a concentration camp” presented in bold for added effect, Faulks immediately introduces the reader to the ignorance and innocence of the children not being able to fully understand their predicament because they are both at such a young age. They do not realise the harsh reality that has befallen them and the rest of
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