Compare and Contrast How Grendel Is Portrayed in Grendel and Beowulf

881 Words Dec 21st, 2005 4 Pages
In Grendel, the story is told from Grendel's point of view. Therefore he is not viewed as a killing machine. In Beowulf however, it is the exact opposite. Grendel is seen as a monster who is terrorizing Hrothgar's people. The way Grendel is portrayed in Grendel is different from the way he is portrayed in Beowulf regarding his initiative and purpose. Grendel is portrayed the same in both stories when it comes to his actions and his nature. Grendel's initiative in Grendel is mainly self defense. Grendel was the one who was mistreated first by the humans. It started when he was simply observing the humans and he got caught in a tree. He was then attacked by a bull and several humans. He did not act on the humans first. They automatically …show more content…
"He found them sprawled in sleep, suspecting nothing, their dreams undisturbed. The monster's thoughts were as quick as his greed or his claws." He is said to not have a method to his madness. In Beowulf it seemed that he got pleasure out of killing. Although there are several differences in the way Grendel is described, there are also several things that are the same in both Grendel and Beowulf. One aspect of Grendel that is alike in both stories is the way he acts. In Grendel the monster kills many people. He does it very brutally too. "Enough of that! A night for tearing heads off, bathing in blood. Except, alas, h has killed his quota for the season. Care, take care of the gold-egg-laying goose! There is no limit to desire but desire's needs." This was Grendel's law. He does not take pity on any human. From his point of view, the humans deserved this and they were going to get it. These actions are the same in Beowulf Grendel is undoubtedly a killer. He is does not take pity on the humans at all. When he fights them, he fights and kills ferociously. Grendel is a monster. He has instincts that he cannot overcome. It is almost a kind of creature nature that tells him what to do. He does not have a solid reason for killing these humans brutally other then fact that they started this war with him. When asked why, Grendel asks why not. "How, if I know all this, you may ask, could I hound