Compare and Contrast of ' Sunny's Blues ' and ' Cathedral '

1075 WordsNov 19, 20145 Pages
Compare and Contrast of “ Cathedral “ and “ Sonny’s Blues “ The two stories that will be examined in this essay are two that may not appear to have a great deal in common, but once we look deeper in to the stories it becomes clear that they are similar but still have their own identities, finding strong differences and similarities is the goal of this paper. These stories are “ Cathedral “ which was written by Raymond Carver in nineteen eighty three, and “ Sonny’s Blues “ which was written by James Baldwin in nineteen fifty seven. Both writers Baldwin and Carver were American writers and poets that were famous for…show more content…
”(277). Both stories start with the narrators being very uncomfortable with their fellow protagonists however they slowly are able to be with their guests without feeling the immense pressure. At the end of “ Cathedral “ Robert and the narrator are watching a T.V program talking about cathedrals and Robert asks the narrator to describe it to him. The narrator struggles to verbally describe the building so Robert has him draw it while he places his hand on the narrator’s while he draws, the T.V program ends and the station is off the air but the narrator does not care, he is enjoying himself and is immersed in what he is doing with Robert ” I couldn’t stop. “(109). The wife even wakes up and begs to know what they are doing but neither of them care much and continue with the experience they are having together. In “ Sonny’s Blues “ the narrator and Sonny go to a club where Sonny will be playing with his band, the narrator is still slightly uncomfortable with Sonny but once he hears Sonny playing and sees all of Sonny’s friends gathering around him and loving him, he realizes that Sonny is his own man. The trouble the narrator had with Sonny is that even though he and Sonny are both adults now he still feels the need to

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