Compare and contrast the views of Goffman and Foucault on how social oreder is produced.

1596 WordsNov 30, 20137 Pages
TMA 04 Compare and contrast the views of Goffman and Foucault on how social oreder is produced. In a community some form of order is an essential foundation for people to live and interact together. ‘’Order is part of the way people both imagine and practise their social existence.’’ (Silva et al., 2009, p. 311) Taylor (2004, p.58) argued that ‘’ the human capacity to imagine order is at the foundation of society itself.’’ (Taylor, cited in Silva et al., 2009 p.311) Social order draw in imagination, practices, the fitting together of people and things, and ideas about the past and the future. (Silva et al., 2009)There are many explanations of how social order is produced, Erving Goffman (1959, 1971 and 1972) and Michel Foucault…show more content…
Mondersman called this ‘psychological traffic calming’ encouraging motorists to take responsibility for their actions instead of given them orders and telling them what to do. This flexible approach is built on the idea that a natural interaction between drivers and pedestrians would create a civilised environment without the imposition of the state through control, punishment and power over what is correct to do therefore, making human behaviour central. It relates to Goffman’s examination of the ‘rituals of trust and tact’ in everyday lives that are most invisible to social order. Subsequently, the modernist approach of Buchanan (Silva et al., 2009) illustrate Foucault’s theory that ‘’the development of standardised uniform spaces commanding uniform behaviour, leaving no room for individual interpretation, explaining everything with signs and texts. The government and public authorities look after the citizens’’ (Silva et al., 2009 p. 339). In modernist approach rules, orders and prohibitions enforces behaviour demanding individuals to adapt to the system on the street. The individual conforms to rules and a state solves problems and looks after the people by setting up laws and prohibitions. In contrast, the flexible approach or shared space movement has the opposite outcome, making human behaviour central and negotiating ‘shared space’ as emphasised by Goffman. (Silva et al., 2009) Another example to

    More about Compare and contrast the views of Goffman and Foucault on how social oreder is produced.

      Open Document