Comparing Barbara Huttmann's 'Crime of Compassion' and Martin Gansberg's Article about the Murder of Kitty Genovese

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Reading Reponses: Barbara Huttmann's Crime of Compassion and Martin Gansberg's Thirty-Eight Who Saw Murder and Didn't Call Police Even people who have not read Martin Gansberg's article about the murder of Kitty Genovese are probably familiar with its contents. On March 14, 1964, in Kew Gardens in New York, a killer stalked Kitty Genovese and began a series of violent attacks against her. These attacks lasted for an extended period of time and were witnessed by no less than thirty-eight individuals. "Twice their chatter and the sudden glow of their bedroom lights interrupted him and frightened him off. Each time he returned, sought her out, and stabbed her again. Not one person telephoned the police during the assault; one witness called after the woman was dead" (Gansberg, 1964). It was a shocking event, which horrified people because they simply could not understand how people could witness a murder and do nothing, not even call the police, to stop it. It was all the more horrifying because the length of time it took the killer to murder Genovese suggests that had even one of the witnesses picked up the telephone and called the police, her murder could have been prevented. The scenario described by Barbara Huttmann also involved a person watching a death without intervening, but the circumstances were very different. Huttmann was a nurse working with a critically ill cancer patient named Mac. Mac was terminally ill with cancer, but his doctor had not filled out the

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