Comparing Brutus' and Mark Antony's Funeral Speeches in Julius Caeser by William Shakespeare

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Comparing Brutus' and Mark Antony's Funeral Speeches in Julius Caeser by William Shakespeare

Julius Caeser is a well known play written by William Shakespeare. It is based on the life and after life of the great roman leader, Caeser. One of the most important and memorable scenes in the play is when Brutus and Mark Antony give their speeches at Caeser's funeral. In this essay I will be comparing to two, noting the key speech writing elements, and finally concluding which I think is most effective.

The first speech we hear is that of Brutus. In his speech he aims to justify his reasons for killing Caeser, and also hopefully gain the backing of his fellow Romans.

In Antony's speech he is
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Antony also uses hyperbole. He said 'when the poor hath cried, Caeser hath wept.' Again Caeser wouldn't literally have cried, although he may have been upset. This exaggeration helps to create the image that Caeser wasn't so bad after all.

Rhetorical questions are a very influential persuasive device, and can be pinpointed in both speeches. Brutus uses them to see if the listeners are proud to be Romans, 'who here is so vile that will not love his country?' This gives the audience something to contemplate on, and they all say 'non Brutus non.' Brutus gets his desired answer. Antony uses rhetorical devices also. He says 'did in this Caeser seem ambitious?' He is asking the crowd whether they think that refusing the crowd is ambition. Both of these questions are effective because they involve the audience in their speeches, by asking them an question.

In both speeches, the writers use 'threes', this is where they string three words together, thus making them memorable. Brutus uses 'friends, countrymen and lovers' when he refers to the crowd, he uses lovers, meaning lovers of Rome. Antony uses a similar combination calling the crowd 'friends Romans and countrymen.' This makes the crowd feel as if the speakers are their friends.

Brutus' speech is written in prose. I think this is because he wants to make the speech understandable to all the listeners, at all

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