Comparing Christina Rossetti’s Goblin Market and William Wordsworth’s The Thorn

1713 WordsJul 7, 20187 Pages
Comparing Christina Rossetti’s Goblin Market and William Wordsworth’s The Thorn On the surface, the poems “Goblin Market” by Christina Rossetti and “The Thorn” by William Wordsworth appear to be very different literary works. “Goblin Market” was written by a young woman in the Victorian period about two sisters who develop a special bond through the rescue of one sister by the other. “The Thorn” was written by the Romantic poet William Wordsworth about a middle-aged man and his experience overlooking a woman’s emotional breakdown. Material to understanding the works “Goblin Market” and “The Thorn” is recognizing the common underlying themes of sex and gender and how these themes affect perspective in both poems.…show more content…
So another situation is created in which the ‘fallen’ woman must rely upon her sister to provide strength and health through self-sacrifice until the addiction can be overcome. Also reinforced are Rossetti’s warnings to her reader that men are dangerous, and that women serve as the only strength for one another. The ideas of feminism and oppression also determine Rossetti’s point of view throughout “Goblin Market.” The first and most present throughout is the perspective of Lizzie. She is portrayed as the wiser more mature sister. Lizzie is standing outside of the oppressive situations of first, Jeannie and most importantly, her sister Laura. Both troublesome situations are caused by the Goblin men, and Lizzie can somehow see straight through their evil ways. Lizzie comes to Laura’s rescue with bravery and diligence just in time to save her sister from the ultimate doom of the ‘illness’: She brings the fiery antidote, and she is the fiery antidote,” and “…she brings back the forbidden fruit without tasting it herself,” quotes Mermin (112.) Both Lizzie’s maturity and Laura’s childishness are indicated by the strength they have against the temptation of the forbidden fruit. Laura represents the younger sister, who is naïve and less wise to the ways of the evil Goblin men and the male-dominated world. She relies heavily on her older sister to save her from the personal consequences of the Goblin

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