Comparing First Dates in Sotto's Oranges and Wetherell's The Bass, the River, and Shelia Mant

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First Dates in Sotto's Oranges and Wetherell's The Bass, the River, and Shelia Mant Everyone is born with innocence and they gradually gain experience through lessons learned in life; some people may gain more that others. Not all lessons in life are dramatic or negative, some may be subtle, positive, or even life altering; however, no matter how small or big, they do alter one's perspective on things and help them to gain experience, which will be with them forever. These experiences may be gained through love, war, or death, but in some way or another they have changed one's point of view. The works "Oranges", written by Gary Sotto, and "The Bass, the River, and Shelia Mant", written by W.D. Wetherell, both tell about a boys…show more content…
He pulls the fish almost all the way down the river until he sees where he has to stop at. So, he cuts the line and lets the fish go. During their date, Shelia danced with him once or twice but she left with another guy. However, he is not upset that she left; he is upset about the fish. Wetherell states that, "There would be other Shelia Mants in my life other fish, and though I came close once or twice, it was these secret, hidden tuggings in the night that claimed me, and I never made the same mistake again" (196). So, he realizes not to change himself for someone to like him, because there would be other girls in the future. The poem "Oranges" also deals with a boys first date and love. The speaker, who is only twelve, walked to the girl's house with his hands in his pockets holding two oranges. It was December and so cold that he could see his breath. When he arrived at her house she came out and he smiled and put his arm on her shoulder. They walked to drugstore and he told her to pick out a piece of candy, she was so excited. He had a nickel in his pocket; however, when she lifted a piece of chocolate that cost a dime he took a nickel and placed it on the counter and then the orange. The saleslady did not say anything, but just smiled. When they got outside they walked a little ways then stopped. She ate her chocolate. Sotto concludes, "I peeled my

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