Comparing To His Coy Mistress by Andrew Marvell and Sonnet 138 by William Shakespeare

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Comparing To His Coy Mistress by Andrew Marvell and Sonnet 138 by William Shakespeare I am comparing 'To His Coy Mistress' by Andrew Marvell (1640) and 'Sonnet 138' by William Shakespeare (1590). The similarities between both poems are that they both use a certain amount of syllables throughout each poem. 'To His Coy Mistress' uses 8 syllables per line, and 'Sonnet 138' uses 10 syllables per line. Another obvious similarity is that they both end with a couplet. They both also tell a story. The differences in the poems are that 'To His Coy Mistress' is arguing why they should get on with life, and Carpe diem whereas 'Sonnet 138' is telling us about how he doesn't trust her, yet he loves her. They…show more content…
The first stage is saying if we had enough time, I could spend all the ages of this world loving you and flattering you until you were content. I would spend all my life giving you everything you deserve and you could be in one place and me in another, but it wouldn't matter as time will never run out and we will always be in love. Marvell then goes on to say that he would have loved her before God sent the flood and that she could refuse him forever if that was what she wanted. 'And you should, if you please, refuse Till the conversion of the Jews' This quote shows that she could say no to him for as long as she wanted, even until all the Jews were converted to be a Roman Catholic. At the time this seemed very unlikely, as Jews were being persecuted for their beliefs and refused to change their religion. Marvell then tells his lady that his love for her would grow and grow without ever dying out. 'My vegetable love should grow Vaster than empires, and more slow' ----------------------------------- In this line 'My vegetable love' is a double entendre, because he is talking about himself but he is also saying that their love would develop naturally and grow to be bigger than the empire, but, it would be taken nice and slowly. In the next few lines he starts to praise her body by starting at the top. He praises her eyes and her forehead, as it was

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