Comparing William Wordsworth's Composed Upon Westminster Bridge and William Blake's London

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Compare and Contrast William Wordsworth's Composed Upon Westminster Bridge and William Blake's London William Wordsworth and William Blake wrote poems about London, but they presented their views from different angles. Wordsworth sees the beauty in London and Blake sees only the ugliness. William Wordsworth's "Composed Upon Westminster Bridge" gives a step-by-step look at the awe-inspiring beauty of a London sunrise, whereas William Blake's "London" shows the dreary ugliness of London life by taking a stroll down London's streets. "Composed Upon Westminster Bridge" affects the reader with a sense of wonderment at the beauty that is created with a sunrise. London appears to be the most beautiful place on earth during a sunrise.…show more content…
The sun is even personified with "Never did the sun more beautifully steep! In his first splendor..."(9,lO). Blake, on the other hand, fills his poem with connotations to reinforce his statement of the ugliness of life. The sense of bondage is evident in "The mind-forged manacles ..." (8) with the word manacles conjuring images of chains of bondage. The sense of unchanging drudgery is in the repeated use of the word chartered: "each chartered street, / Near where the chartered Thames..." (1,2) where chartered creates the image of an ordered and unchanging lay out of London. The use of the words blights and hearse in "And blights with plagues the marriage hearse" (16) has the reader envisioning the ugliness of disease and death. Both authors use the many aspects of imagery to enhance their poems. Wordsworth brings about a very visual sight of the sunrise with "A sight so touching in its majesty" (3) and causes the reader to pause and wonder at the magnitude of the upcoming beauty. "All bright and glittering in the smokeless air" (8) has the reader seeing a clear bright picture with no haze. He causes the reader to feel a moment of wonder at the beauty of the emptiness and silence of morning with "the beauty of the morning; silent, bare," (5) and a sense of peace with "Ne'er saw I, never felt, a calm so deep!" (11) and"... the

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