Comparing the Great Gatsby and Winter Dreams

2747 Words Nov 16th, 2010 11 Pages
Fitzgerald Essay
“And one fine morning...” With this phrase, appearing on the last page of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s masterpiece The Great Gatsby, narrator Nick Carraway effectively sums up the motivating force that drives the novel’s titular character, Jay Gatsby. It is the achievement of the American Dream that hangs – unreached – at the end of Carraway’s sentence. In this way, the story leaves us with a similar lasting taste of longing, the bittersweet realization that powerful as the Dream may be, it is just that: a dream. And yet, while the Dream, like the sentence – is never fully realized, this unrealization is itself a source of motivation for continuance. There is still the promise of that “one fine morning” making it impossible to
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This plan ended up working for Gatsby, because he met Daisy, whom he then did not see for a while, and bought a large house. Jay Gatsby threw extravagant parties each Saturday to prove that he had social status, and money. One thing about Gatsby is that nobody knows about his past. People make up rumours about him, but no one really knows his story. Gatsby is too ashamed of his background to tell anyone the real story. Because nobody knows Gatsby very well, this makes him very mysterious. For Nick, Gatsby is very mysterious because he is his next door neighbour, yet he has never met him. When Nick first sees Gatsby, he does not know what to think. This passage describes Nick’s first look at Gatsby “He stretched out his arms toward the dark water in a curious way, and, far as I was from him, I could have sworn he was trembling. Involuntarily I glanced seaward- and distinguished nothing except a single green light, minute and far away, that might have been the end of a dock. When I looked once more for Gatsby he had vanished, and I was alone again in the unquiet darkness” (25). The reader later finds out that Gatsby was looking at the green light on Daisy’s dock. Dexter Green is quite similar to Gatsby in many ways. Dexter was also born into a family in which he wanted to leave, and change his identity. To try and get some status, Dexter worked as a caddy at a rich golf course, where he met Judy. He first met Judy as a young boy, but
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