Comparing the Poetry of John Keats and Robert Frost

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John Keats was a British Romantic poet who helped to develop and influence the he second generation of Romantic poets in the 19th century. Keats' poetry has been characterized by its ode structure and high use of imagery. Like many Romantics, Keats was inspired by his environment and prized imagination about rational thought. In "When I Have Fears That I May Cease to Be," written in 1818 and published posthumously in 1848, Keats use natural imagery to explore and come to terms with his fear of dying before he has been able to accomplish everything he has set out to. Likewise, Robert Frost, an acclaimed American poet of the late 19th and 20th century, sets out to explore the formation of individuality and self through natural imagery. In "The Road Not Taken," published in 1916, Frost reminisces about the impact that taking the "road less travelled" has had on his life. Both Keats and Frost explore issues of uncertainty and regret in "When I Have Fears That I May Cease to Be" and "The Road Not Taken." Keats quickly establishes his insecurities about life and death in "When I Have Fears That I May Cease to Be," yet proceeds to explain how he does not fear death it may befall him, but rather he fears that he will not be able to put to paper everything he has within him, that he will no longer be privy to the wonders of nature, or that he will be taken prematurely from those he loves. Keats explains he fears he may die "Before my pen has glean'd my teeming brain,/Before

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