Comparing the poems Dulce Et Decorum Est and Anthem for Doomed Youth

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Comparing the poems Dulce Et Decorum Est and Anthem for Doomed Youth, comment on the poet's use of language and poetic technique showing how successful he is in conveying his message.

'Comparing the poems 'Dulce Et Decorum Est' and 'Anthem for Doomed
Youth', comment on the poet's use of language and poetic technique showing how successful he is in conveying his message.

'Comparing the poems 'Dulce Et Decorum Est' and 'Anthem for Doomed
Youth', comment on the poet's use of language and poetic technique showing how successful he is in conveying his message.

Wilfred Owen wrote both the poems 'Dulce Et Decorum Est' and 'Anthem for Doomed Youth' during the First World War.

Wilfred Owen was a British poet born in 1893. He
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'Dulce Et Decorum Est' is about the mis-conceptions of war being all about glory. Owen portrays his thought across to the reader of what he has experienced as a soldier in war and he has seen horrifying things that have nothing to do with glory. As it gets towards the end of the poem, in the last verse, Owen gives a warning to the readers not to be delusional to glory but to know the true emotions of war, death, pain and misery. The title is important because it is a sarcastic comment on war and miss-conceives us that the poem is about the glory of war.
The title attracts readers because they will be the people back at home that only know of the glory. Also the title could attract young boys/men who want to go to war because they like the idea of glory.

The poem is written in free verse because Owen is just letting his thoughts pour out onto paper. It is possible that he was reflecting in the trenches after a battle about the things he had just seen. Maybe that's why he goes into such detail because the events are so fresh in his mind. However, he is in a position where he has to do what he is told and he cant go home because he is restricted to fighting in the war, his mind is able to wander and his thoughts are not restricted at all. The poem is set in four sections and I have discovered that they are in chronological order. The first stanza is about the men