Comparison Between Japanese and Malaysian Culture

3251 Words Nov 2nd, 2012 14 Pages
Comparison between Japanese and Malaysian culture Japan is an island nation in East Asia. The characters that make up Japan's name mean "sun-origin", which is why Japan is sometimes referred to as the "Land of the Rising Sun". Japan is an archipelago of 6,852 islands. The four largest islands are Honshū, Hokkaidō, Kyūshū and Shikoku, together accounting for 97 % of 378,000km2 land area. Japan has four seasons climate which is spring, summer, autumn and winter. Japan has the world's tenth-largest population, with over 127 million people. The Greater Tokyo Area, which includes the de facto capital city of Tokyo and several surrounding prefectures, is the largest metropolitan area in the world, with over 30 million residents. Urban …show more content…
Chinese Malaysians predominately speak Chinese dialects from the southern provinces of China. The more common dialects in the country are Cantonese, Mandarin, Hokkien, Hakka, Hainanese, and Fuzhou. Tamil is used predominantly by Tamils, who form a majority of Malaysian Indians. Other south Asian languages are also widely spoken in Malaysia, such as Thai. A small number of Malaysians have Caucasian ancestry and speak creoles languages, such as the Portuguese based Malaccan Creoles and the Spanish based Chavacano language. Malay is a member of the Austronesian family of languages and is now written using the Latin script (Rumi), although an Arabic alphabet called Jawi also exists. Rumi is official in Malaysia. 96 % of the Japanese population subscribe to Buddhism or Shinto, including a large number of followers of a syncretism of both religions. Japan enjoys full religious freedom and minority religions such as Christianity, Islam, Hinduism and Sikhism are practiced. Figures that state 84% to 96% of Japanese adhere to Shinto and Buddhism are not based on self-identification but come primarily from birth records, following a longstanding practice of officially associating a family line with a local Buddhist temple or Shinto shrine. According to Johnstone (1993:323), 84% of the Japanese claim no personal religion. Nevertheless the level of participation remains high, especially during festivals and
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