Comparison/Contrast Renaisssance and Baroque Essay

967 Words May 3rd, 2005 4 Pages
The baroque and renaissance periods are two different periods. The renaissance period rolled into the baroque era. There were changes made over the years from the baroque to the renaissance period. Differences in style accumulated along with views of art and music.
Baroque era covers the period between 1600 and 1750 beginning with Monte Verdi (birth of opera) and ended with deaths of Bach and Handel. The term baroque music is borrowed from the art history. It follows the Renaissance era (1400-1600). It was initially considered to be a corrupt way of Renaissance by conservatives. The dominant trends in Baroque music correspond to those in Baroque art and literature. Some features of Baroque art included a sense of movement, energy, and
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The renaissance can be divided into two parts Early Renaissance (1420-1500) and High Renaissance (1500-1520). The Renaissance era was one of the most productive time periods in history as far as the advancement of music goes. At first it was rigid, structured and learnt by academic training. The new concept of renaissance music became much more expressive, and the sound and quality of the instruments became more refined and more pleasant to listen to. Instruments such as the harpsichord, the spinet, and the lute became more than just accompaniment for singers; they became a way of expressing emotions. A modern listener can almost picture what the Renaissance composer or musician was feeling when he or she was writing a piece of music. The music of the Elizabethan era had a large influence on the advancement of all music. Humanism was the basic concept of the Italian Renaissance. It is the term used to define that philosophical movement in Italy at the end of the 14th century and during the 15th and 16th centuries which asserted the right of the individual to the use of his own reason and belief, and stressed the importance and potential of man as an individual. [3] This concept can be identified with a belief in the power of learning and science to produce "the complete man". This was the way of their world and the basis of their modern civilization. Modern Humanism originated in the Renaissance when scholars, writers, poets,
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