Comparison between Charlie Chaplin's "The Kid" and Rowan Atkinson's "Mr. Bean - The Ultimate Disaster Movie"

1457 Words Mar 17th, 2004 6 Pages
Name: Toh Lai Hee

Class: IA04B (Interactive Art)

Lecturer: Lydia

Subject: Art History

The most apparent similarity between these two films is that both films revolve around the daily lives of the main characters.

The main characters, Charlie and Mr. bean, in The Kid and Mr. Bean - The Ultimate Disaster Movie respectively, both have child-like qualities, and the tendency to be rather mischievous. Mr. Bean is naive and self-centered, sometimes to the extent of becoming somewhat mean. Despite his considerable age, he still sleeps cuddled up with his teddy bear. Nothing is sacred to him, and he plays his games with an earnest sheepishness. His childish directness and honesty, while offensive at times, are his sharpest weapons. The little
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Bean himself, in a typically 'English' environment, then later putting him in an 'international' environment. Being release in 1997 it is a light-hearted satire of how the more conservative English society reacts to and attempt to adapt to rapidly changing international standards and the shifts in power.

The main difference of these two movies is that The Kid aims to bring some cheer to its audiences' hearts by showing how joy can still be found in the gloomiest conditions (as depicted in the daily lives of Charlie and the child he has adopted) and also to reflect the state of the society while Mr. Bean - The Ultimate Disaster Movie seeks to bring some comic relief into the highly stressful lifestyle of the modern-day individual, by actually letting them laugh at a highly exaggerated, and therefore comic, version of 'themselves'.

As mentioned earlier, the era in which Charlie Chaplin's The Kid was made did not allow for colour or sound to be incorporated into its production. Being disadvantaged in this area, the actors in the film had to make up for it by emphasizing on facial expressions and body movements, in order to express thoughts and emotions, and also to portray certain unique mannerisms and character traits of the various characters in the story. Modern-day audiences who are unaccustomed to this form of acting might feel uncomfortable viewing films from the silent era, because the actors may seem to them, to be over-acting to an outrageous
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