Comparison of Dulce et Decorum Est and Anthem for Doomed Youth

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Comparison of Dulce et Decorum Est and Anthem for Doomed Youth

When I was searching for two poems to compare, I saw these two poems and wanted to explore them to find out how Wifred Owen uses language in different ways to warn future generations of the horror of war.

Wilfred Owen fought in the First World War. He enlisted as most young men were doing, so that they could protect Britain. However, in the trenches he realized how horrific the war was and started to make notes about the conditions at first. Then later in a military hospital he edited and collected these notes into the poetry of Wifred Owen.

'Dulce et Decorum Est' is Latin for: It is sweet and fitting (to die for one's country). This line is repeated at the end
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In the title are the words, 'Doomed
Youth' which immediately informs the reader that this sonnet isn't a fairy tale or a happy tale of love but is a distressing poem about the boys who went to war 'doomed' never to return.

There is a strong marching beat to the poem and as it is entitled
'anthem', I believe that Owen wanted this poem to sound like a funeral march. And the march is set to a backdrop of sounds from battle. These sounds include: bells, choirs, bugles, 'wailing shells and angry guns'
(personification - Owen personifies the guns but the soldiers are not even mentioned. Owen wants the reader to feel that the artillery in the poem was not being controlled by the soldiers.)

'Dulce,' on the other hand, is written in free verse with an alternate line rhyming pattern. It uses similes such as 'like old beggars under sacks' and 'Bitter as the cud'. Owen's choice of language has a supernatural theme. He uses words such as 'hags', 'devil', and
'writhing face'. These words remind me of a bad nightmare, but this must be what Owen wants the reader to see. It might sound like a nightmare but you will be able to wake up from a nightmare whereas he is talking about life in the trenches and there was no way out for these young men, no way just to wake up. In fact, the only way out for many men was their inevitable death.

'Anthem' asks a question at the beginning of each stanza,
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