Confessions of an Advertising Man Book Review

1336 Words Oct 17th, 2011 6 Pages
David Ogilvy is known as the father of advertising and in his book, “Confessions of an Advertising man”, he lists out the principles he followed to take his agency, Ogilvy, Benson and Mather to the peak of advertising industry. In this book, he also offers advice to both the clients and the agencies on the dos and don'ts of the advertising industry.
The book is an excellent read which entails how an organization should work, what an employer, how objective he should be, how to maintain high motivation levels in his employees, how to lead by example and how honest you should be with your employees and clients without being naïve. For all this, he used real life examples. In short, the book illustrates many aspects of organizational
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He emphasizes on keeping his staff happy, and talks of the importance of providing them the ideal place to work. This has been the top most priority of O&M. Ogilvy also talks of treating his staff as human beings, investing an awful lot to help them make the best use of their talents, glorifying hard work, honesty, gentle manners and detesting politics, toadies and ruthlessness. He talks of O&M as an organization where there is no nepotism or any other form of favoritism and the way up the ladder is open to all.
Ogilvy also lays down his approach towards clients and gave his one of the most famous quotes: “We sell – or else”. He emphasizes on treating the customer like your wife and to know the fact that you cannot force customers to buy anything but can only interest them.
In the first chapter, Ogilvy talks of inspiring his staff by methods of praise but also emphasizes on keeping it to minimal, as that will enable the employees to appreciate the importance of it. It is also important for the boss to lead by example and Ogilvy himself worked overtime, reviewed every ad multiple times to set an example. Ogilvy also called on annual gatherings of al his staff worldwide to give them reports of the agency’s operations, profits and all and then tell them what are his expectations. He went into great details to streamline his expectations of himself and his staff so that there was no prejudice or sense of injustice.
In the second chapter, Ogilvy lists out the ways
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