Conflict In Paradise Lost

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Unlike the Biblical account of the fall in the Book of Genesis, with his epic poem, Paradise Lost, John Milton adds a lot of detail about the complete story of Man, the beginning of Satan, his rise and Man's Fall. Although the ideas for Paradise Lost came from a few pages in the Book of Genesis, Milton's account kept readers wondering what was going to happen next. Because he was going against the church already with Paradise Lost, it was more intriguing for him to take the same ideas in the Bible and extend them into more detail, making Satan look like the Hero and succeeding at what he wanted to do. Satan the perfect angel banished from nothing to the pits of Hell, with no chance of return, conjures up a plan to get revenge, building a legacy…show more content…
In Paradise Lost, God is almost emotionless or aloof; he embodies pure reason and pure justice, and every response he gives seems to be cold. In Genesis God is wise and known as the creator and is more the narrator of what is happening than in Milton's epic. Also He is referred to as Lord God, instead of God, like Milton refers to Him. So, in close the start and fall Man to summarize the creation and reason for human nature is "God gave Man free will, from Man's free will, sin and death came into the world." Paradise Lost was about Adam and Eve, how they came to be created, the fall of Satan and his journey to get back at God by corrupting Adam and Eve. The main plot of this took place in God's creation called the Garden of Eden. Paradise Lost is similar to the book of Genesis because its story comes from the main pages of Genesis, chapters one through four. My thesis is: While the Book of Genesis portrays Satan as an evil antagonist, Milton's Paradise Lost presents him as a more sympathetic character. Perhaps not a hero, but an anti-hero. An anti-hero is someone who lacks the attributes of a hero, such as courage or being morally

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