‘Conflict is more often driven by self-interest than genuine sense of right and wrong.’ The Quiet American

1235 WordsOct 11, 20135 Pages
‘Conflict is more often driven by self-interest than genuine sense of right and wrong.’ “Show me a man who has no interest in his own good, and I'll show you a man who is not in touch with his own humanity." R. Alan Woods. Conflict can be driven by any emotion whether it be greed, love, hate or lust, after all conflict occurs merely when an individual feels something strong enough that they will not quell before opposition in violation of this emotion, because of this assessing the most frequent motive behind conflict could be investigated by asking the question; What emotion is the strongest and most frequent in humans? Doubtless, the answer to this question is relative to its target, a cynic might declare hate, a romantic love, a…show more content…
Catherine Susan "Kitty" Genovese was a New York City woman who was stabbed to death and repeatedly raped near her home. Investigations recorded 38 witnesses, none of whom attempted to assist Kitty personally and only one whom called the police, afterwards stating “I didn’t want to get involved” The incident of “Kitty” Genovese’s death exemplifies the extraordinary lengths that humans can go in an attempt to prevent self-loss even at the cost of another’s far more severe personal loss. By not acting these neighbors failed to stand up for their moral code and in doing so failed to act on behalf of what they presumably believed to be right at the cost of another s life, this also establishes the ability of self-interest to not only drive conflict in the way that self-interest allowed the event to occur on the side of the attacker, who was likely motivated by lust or anger, but to also discourage opposing action in bystanders out of a fear of personal loss. The actions the witnesses of “Kitty’s“ fate took mirror the attitude of a large degree of the human populations attitudes. Historically, few stand up for their beliefs and moral code at great personal risk, the strength of self-preservation Is too strong for most , for every “hero” that acts, hundreds of bystanders fail to act. The existence of “heroes” Itself is evidence that humans often fail to act in times of conflict, after all if there was more people who acted

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