Conflicting Perspectives-to Kill a Mockingbird

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The concept of conflicting perspectives is consistently present in Harper Lees’ novel To Kill a Mockingbird. The text asks questions about current trends in society and the attitudes that cause people to ‘act like sheep” and conform while also expressing the need for individuality. It also brings into question the way the judicial system should be beyond reproach no matter what man is on trial, whether they be white or black. In a similar manner it also shows changing attitudes in regards to racism over time and in turn establish a conflicting perspective between the reader and characters of the novel. Written in the 1960’s and set in the 1930’s, the text is removed from its immediate context as it portrays the defence of a black man,…show more content…
Another conflicting perspective is set up between the readers themselves and the characters of the novel. The reader empathises with Atticus’ goal and is shocked and affronted to the racism presented in this novel. In our, the responder’s, context racism is looked down upon however Lee contrasts this to the context of her novel where racism is ever present. The common conception of the 1930’s is shown in the repetition of “Negro”,
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