Conflicting Visions of Freedom in John Stuart Mill’s On Liberty and John Locke’s The Second Treatise of Government

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John Stuart Mill’s On Liberty and John Locke’s The Second Treatise of Government are influential literary works while which outlining the theoretical framework of each thinkers optimal state propose two conflicting visions of the very essence of man and his freedom. Locke and Mill have completely different views when it comes to how much freedom man should have in political society because they have obtained different views about man’s potential of inheriting pure or evil behavior.
In chapter two labeled as “Liberty of Thought and Discussion”, Mill includes two separate arguments in his writing. His first argument focuses on the assumption that suppressed opinions could be true for all we know; this argument takes place on pages 16-17.
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John Stuart Mill’s On Liberty and John Locke’s The Second Treatise of Government are influential literary works while which outlining the theoretical framework of each thinkers optimal state propose two conflicting visions of the very essence of man and his freedom. Locke and Mill have completely different views when it comes to how much freedom man should have in political society because they have obtained different views about man’s potential of inheriting pure or evil behavior.
In chapter two labeled as “Liberty of Thought and Discussion”, Mill includes two separate arguments in his writing. His first argument focuses on the assumption that suppressed opinions could be true for all we know; this argument takes place on pages 16-17. Man must be open to criticism as silencing a person’s opinion harms mankind. Suppose the silenced opinion turns out to be true; this inflicts harm on mankind as humanity has denied the opportunity to exchange falsehood for truth. This particular argument is aimed at those who effectively silence/challenge opinions; they assume they are infallible. Beliefs such as these, shared beliefs if you will, cause people to believe they are never wrong. An example of this involves those who no longer believe that the world is flat; this is a disowned belief that was once believed by many. The first objection of Mill’s argument enforces the idea of giving voice to a contrary opinion. Man has no choice but to act out what they believe to be their best
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