Construction Types and Occupancy Classifications

2261 Words Mar 4th, 2013 10 Pages
Fire 73:

Construction Types & Occupancy Classifications

Fire 73: Fire Prevention Technology

Learning Outcomes
Following instruction the student shall:
Understand fire resistive construction, noncombustible construction, combustible construction, and what constitutes fire-resistance. Identify and describe each of the five construction types and the construction features and fire dangers that are common to each construction type.

Chapter 4:

Construction Types & Occupancy Classifications

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Chapter 4: Construction Types & Occupancy Classifications

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Learning Outcomes
Following instruction the student shall:
Understanding building use, what determines the occupancy classification per the fire code, and the dangers of illegal building
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Combustible materials allowed on non-structural:
Wall coverings, roof coverings, finish flooring, wood trim.
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Type-II, Noncombustible Construction

Type-II
Structural members are non-combustible. In fire, contribute little or no fuel. Fire load is the contents.

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Chapter 4: Construction Types & Occupancy Classifications

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Chapter 4

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Fire 73:

Construction Types & Occupancy Classifications

Type-II
Are the building materials or the building contents the risk?

Type-III, Ordinary

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Type-III
Commonly called:
Ordinary Masonry Limited Combustible Exterior Protected

“Main Street” USA
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Type-III
Exterior walls are non-combustible.
Usually masonry material. 2-hour fire-resistance rating.

Type-III
Concealed Void Spaces:
Primary fire concern are concealed void spaces between the walls, floor, and ceiling. Fire detection delayed.

Much of the structure may contribute to fire.
Roof may be of combustible construction. Interior members may be combustible. May have small dimensional lumber. Concealed void