Contribution of Munshi Premchand in Fields of Literature

1520 Words Feb 26th, 2013 7 Pages
Baffling as certainly an endeavour to provide an exhaustive list of Tagore’s achievements in the various fields like music, dance, painting, histrionics, education, etc., would be, even the effort to describe his output within the limited field of literary and poetic writing would be, difficult. Indeed his contribution to ever so many types and forms of writing is amazing, if not defying adequate enumeration. As one of his admirers, the lateMahamahopadhyaya Harprasada Sastri, said: “He has tried all phases of literature–couplets, stanzas, short poems, long pieces, short stories, fables, novels and prose romances, dramas, farces, comedies and tragedies, songs, opera, Kirtans, Palas and, last but not least, lyric poems. He has succeeded in …show more content…
For instance, a few poems may speak of a strain of melody and the sweet-throated bird that pours it out. But this does not by itself make all of them same on as repetitions of one single idea in three succeeding pieces. If scanned with care each will be found to possess a particular idea, very near what occurs in the three others, yet not without a distinctiveness that makes the difference. Persons who are familiar with Karnatic music, know that the Sangatis of a Pallavi of great composers like Thyagayya often appear as mere repetitions to the uninformed ear, though containing minute points of elaboration and differentiation, which develop clearly the growth of the song into a surpassing climax of mood and feeling. Of course to those who will not undergo the discipline of a seasoned critic, everything will appear as redundancy of execution and purposeless elaboration. There can be a further argument as to why at all should any poet worth the name, do that sort of thing so as to cause strain on the listener or reader to scan beauty and meaning in them. Well, let us try to comfort such lazy individuals with the answer, that a writer’s emotions require perhaps more than a couple of lines similar for gaining his own sense of fulfilment. The critic also will have to reconcile himself to the fact that he is under no compulsion to read all of them. Again it may be only on a par with the other criticism that, had the
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