Corporate Social Responsibility

10163 Words Feb 9th, 2000 41 Pages
CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY By Lori S. Mohr-Corrigan, For The Paper Store - © October 1999 VISIT -- for more information on using this paper properly! Because society is fundamentally based upon performance and profit, it is not unusual to find that it is necessary to impart a sense of corporate social responsibility with regard to contemporary commerce. The ethical approaches of purpose, principle and consequence are integral components of business social performance; itemizing these contributions finds one incorporating the interests of ethics and morality within the corporate structure, essential concepts that are often absent from a managerial standpoint. Chapters two and three of Beauchamp and …show more content…
The values of honesty, promise- keeping, truth-telling, benevolence and justice, endure because they are essential to the social fabric of human existence. Without certain fundamental principles of fair dealing and mutual respect, business would be impossible" (Ruin, 1997, p. PG). Establishing and maintaining corporate ethics is indeed principle to continued success, both on a personal and professional level. Beauchamp et al (1996) provide reminders that constant nurturing of moral judgment and a specific code of ethics is in order as a means by which to perpetuate the positive image necessary to uphold such policy. "…The critics of principlism have failed to make a compelling case against its theoretical or practical adequacy as an ethical approach" (Lustig, 1992, p. 487). The primary elements of such nurturing include having a clear and concise forthrightness, which is substantiated by culture; appropriate and applicable conformity with regard to difficult situations; managerial involvement and awareness on ethics issues; a nurturing program that is wholeheartedly supported by top management; and staff involvement. These concepts, which are both interrelated and individual at the same time, represent a complete quest toward ethical decision-making. "No one element can create or sustain ethical management; and weakness in one element could undermine the whole effort" (Ruin, 1997, p. PG). One can easily surmise from Beauchamp et al (1996) that diversity is truly key to