Corrections Final Paper

4809 WordsApr 18, 201320 Pages
Final Paper Student ID: Maya DeNola California State University Long Beach CRJU 303 – Corrections December 12, 2012 Professor: Ryan Fischer Table of Content Introduction………………………………………………………………………………………..2 Historical perspective ……………………………………………………………………………..5 Current Policy surrounding mental health treatment in prisons…………………………………..7 Evidence to support the current/historical correctional approaches………………………………9 Evidence to refute the current/historical correctional approaches……………………………….10 Evidence of innovative correctional approaches………………………………………………...11 Suggested approach to address the issue ………………………………………………………..12 Conclusion……………………………………………………………………………………….13…show more content…
According to the study, by the Treatment Advocacy Center, psychiatric beds are now available at a level equivalent to that of 1850 (Torrey et al., 2012), the point in history at which the treatment of the mentally ill started to change with a shift to state run facilities. One of the major consequences of this crisis is seen in jails and prisons around the nation that are “increasingly populated by individuals with untreated mental illness, with some facilities reporting that one-third or more of their inmates are severely mentally ill.”(Torrey et al., 2012. p. 6). One measure of the social and economic costs of this systemic failure is the remarkably high rate of recidivism and the associated social fallout. In California close to 80% of all persons released from prison will return to a state of incarceration within 1-3 years of release. An overwhelming number of these returning inmates are doing so as a function of their failure to meet or carry out terms of release, not for the commission of new crimes (Maxwell-Royo, 2005). Economically speaking, a person incarcerated in a State Prison in California costs the state on average $49,000 a year to house, feed and protect. Amplify that by the latest number of prisoners in state facilities, approximately 119,000 and we arrive at the staggering figure of $5,831,000,000, wasted funds that could have been spent in the community. Considering that California
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