Cost Accounting

134556 WordsNov 25, 2010539 Pages
Solutions Manual for COST ACCOUNTING Creating Value for Management Fifth Edition MICHAEL MAHER University of California, Davis Table of Contents Chapter 1 Cost Accounting: How Managers User Cost Accounting Information Chapter 15 Using Differential Analysis for Production Decisions Chapter 2 Cost Concepts and Behaviour Chapter 16 Managing Quality and Time Chapter 3 Cost System Design: An Overview Chapter 17 Planning and Budgeting Chapter 4 Job Costing Chapter 18 Flexible Budgeting and Performance Evaluation Chapter 5 Process Costing Chapter 19 Performance Evaluation: Cost Variances Chapter 6 Spoilage and Quality Management Chapter 20 Chapter 7 Allocating Costs to Departments…show more content…
Nonvalue-added activities do not add value to the goods or services. 1–4. Differential costs are important for managerial decision making, but other cost data can provide management with additional important information. For example, inventory values and costs of goods sold are important for income tax and financial reporting purposes as well as for most bonus and cost-plus contracting purposes. Costs for performance evaluation are not necessarily differential costs. Companies try to recover all costs, hence some estimate of total costs is needed. (This could be an opportunity to discuss short-run and long-run costs with students, noting that in the long run, all costs must be covered.) © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 1997 Solutions Manual, Chapter 1 1 1–5. Costs that could be shared among housemates might include a share of the rent, food, utilities, and other related costs. Costs that would differ with the addition of another person are the differential costs. These differential costs might include food. It would be necessary to negotiate an agreement between you and the other person considering all factors. For example, should you split the total costs or charge only the differential costs of the additional person. Businesses are often faced with similar decisions on finding the appropriate cost base for splitting costs. There are no generally accepted

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