Crimes Scenes And Evidence Gathering Underpin Every Police Investigation

1971 Words Sep 29th, 2016 8 Pages
Crimes scenes and evidence gathering underpin every police investigation. From the moment police

arrive to a scene to the moment a verdict is decided upon the offender, the way in which crime

scenes are established and evidence gathered holds significant weight on the outcome. By discussing

the provided scenario along with the issues surrounding the establishment of crime scenes, the way

in which evidence is gathered, legislative and policy powers and requirements, and the phenomena

of Locard’s Principle, we can establish an understanding of best practice which ultimately will

positively impact the final outcome of a verdict.

General identifying statement

Ensuring a crime scene is established in the wake of an incident lays the foundation for an effective

investigation. Horswell, J. (2004) describes a crime scene as simply a place which is connected to a

crime or incident, either primary or secondary in nature. A primary crime scene being that of where

the crime occurred and where the majority of evidence can be found, while secondary being that of

where evidence relating to the crime may exist elsewhere (p. 32). In relation to the provided

scenario, the house in case is the primary crime scene; as this is where the incident has occurred and

where the majority of evidence will be located. A secondary crime scene is not present in the scope

of the provided scenario, hypothetically however, if stolen property of the victim was to be found

down the street, this…

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