Critical Analysis Of Faces Of Japan

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Bias and preposterous assumptions about a foreign society are a detriment to the image of that society. Creating a burden to the future comprehension of said society. Doctor David C. Unger, former foreign affairs editorial writer for the New York Times, has stated and debunked said stereotypes in his editorial titled Faces of Japan. In it, Unger argues that Japanese stereotypes are utterly incorrect and the presumptions surrounding Japanese culture are outdated. Japan’s culture is not static, Japanese people are not spending every living moment in remorse after the events of WWII. Unger argues this point through the explicit comparison of Japan in 1992 to Japan in 1945. The goal that Unger is trying to achieve is to compel the audience to…show more content…
Its young people are highly educated, fashion-conscious and remarkably well traveled.” Unger has depicted a visual of Japan’s youth in the minds of the audience. The audience is focused on the idea that Japanese people live just like any other society and establishes that there are now more similarities between the reader and Japanese people. Imagery is an irresistible form of rhetoric to the audience, it also helps the audience sympathize with Japanese people through shared experiences: travel, education, fashion, etc… This imagery is effective on the audience, it paints a picture in the reader 's mind and is appealing to a feeling of commonality. In the minds of some Americans, Japan is a; “...crude caricature, drawn from half-digested sound bites and painted in racist hues.” Unger is describing the biased, and incorrect, ideas that surround Japan. The Japanese are portrayed as faceless and conformist, their real feelings impenetrable to non-Japanese. This supposedly monolithic society is explained in terms of Japan 's militarist traditions, its consensus style of politics and a shared national anxiety over scarce resources. These are said to produce people committed to work unceasingly so that Japan can dominate the world economically, and perhaps militarily too. …
There are Japanese who think like that, but fewer than there used to be. Meanwhile a newer, youth-oriented leisure culture is emerging everywhere, from the nightclubs of Tokyo 's Ginza and
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