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Critical Analysis of The Secret Of Raising Smart Kids”, Carol S. Dweck

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In “The Secret Of Raising Smart Kids”, Carol S. Dweck suggests overpraising children may be counterproductive. Effort, not intelligence or ability, is the key to success in school and life according to the article. Dweck claims there are two views of intelligence, “growth mind-set” and “fixed mind-set”. “Fixed mind-set” is when a student believes that intelligence is a fixed trait and losses confidence when errors are made attributed to their lack of ability. “Growth mind-set” thinks of intelligence as something that can be developed through education and difficult work. Instead of praising a child for their intelligence she suggests giving them a pat on the back for effort. Also, Dweck states that children can develop a “growth mind-set” through a workshop involving a series of study skills sessions and classes on how to apply a “growth mind-set” to school work. I find it hard to agree with Dweck’s claims that there are only two views of intelligence, a proper way to praise, and proposes a child can make up their own mind-set through her workshops. Dweck claims that there are two views of intelligence, “growth mind-set” and “fixed mind-set”, is too far-reaching. “Fixed mind-set” can also be defined as extrinsic motivation because it involves engaging in an attitude that only works to earn external rewards, praise, or to avoid punishments. On the other hand, a “Growth mind-set” is similar to intrinsic motivation, which refers to behavior that is driven by internal rewards.
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