Critical Review on Robinson Crusoe

1487 Words Apr 5th, 2008 6 Pages
Critical Review on Daniel Defoe's "Robinson Crusoe"

Daniel Defoe tells tale of a marooned individual in order to criticize society. By using the Island location, similar to that of Shakespeare's The Tempest, Defoe is able to show his audience exactly what is necessary for the development of a utopian society. In The Tempest, the small society of Prospero's island addresses the aspects of morality, the supernatural and politics in the larger British society. In Defoe's Robinson Crusoe, the island's natural surroundings highlights the subject of man's individual growth, both spiritually and physically. Nature instantly exercises its power and control over man in the tropical storm that leads to the wreckage of Crusoe's ship. "The fury of
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There are no other people to corrupt or destroy the harmony in which Crusoe lives. "It was now that I began sensibly to feel how much more happy this life I now led was than the wicked, cursed, abominable life I led all the past part of my days." (Defoe, 112). Along with the criticism of society, Defoe is able to give representation to the objects around Crusoe that support the idea of the creation a perfect environment. The new-grown barley and corn on the island, which Crusoe calls a "prodigy of Nature" (Defoe, 78) is really symbolic of the spiritual and emotional growth that is taking place within himself. These grains, however, were also a main source of food for Crusoe. The idea of the island and Crusoe living with each other and giving to one another in harmony fully supports the idea of a utopian society.
From isolation to expansion, Crusoe converts fear into bravery. Similarly, the island helps Crusoe convert from pagan into God-fearing. Before his sea adventures begin, religion had little significance to Crusoe. The lack of neither God's nor his father's blessing do not concern him when he decides to "board a ship bound for London" (Defoe, 8). It is when the ship, however, encounters a tempest where "wind began to blow and the sea to rise in a most frightful manner" (Defoe, 8) that Crusoe turns to God for guidance: "if it would please God to spare my life this one voyage, […] I would go directly home to my father

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