Critically Evaluate the Different Roles of the Veterinary Nurse, Explore Legal and Professional Framework That Governs Veterinary Nursing and Discuss Limitations of the Role of the Veterinary Nurse.

2482 WordsMar 1, 201110 Pages
As a profession, veterinary nursing is a relatively new contender in the animal care industry. In 1963, Pamela Pitcher was the first Registered Animal Nursing Auxiliary (RANA) to qualify, however back then there was no legal framework to abide by, no textbooks or a syllabus to refer to and no support or guidelines to follow. Since the sixties, there have been many schemes aiming to improve the veterinary nursing profession; such as putting together an academic syllabus, having a guide to professional conduct and most importantly creating a legal and professional framework. Despite such advances, veterinary nurses (VNs) still continue to encounter limitations in their profession and new challenges are constantly being faced (and some…show more content…
Included in this Act is a section entitled Schedule 3 which explains what non-veterinary surgeons (which include VNs and laypersons) are allowed to provide in terms of medical treatment to animals. Under this legislation, listed/registered VNs are able to administer any medical treatment or minor surgery to a patient as long as this does not involve entry into a body cavity (Earle 2007). Minor surgery could include dental procedures such as scaling, and the removal of teeth which are loose and can be extracted by hand. Dental extractions of relatively intact teeth using instruments are therefore not permitted as that would involve entry into a body cavity. With regards to medical treatment, a VN is able to administer medication orally, subcutaneously, intramuscularly, intravenously, rectally, topically and by inhalation. They are also able to treat patients via fluid therapy, catheterization, cleaning/dressing of surgical wounds, treatment of ulcers, application of external casts and handling of viscera when assisting in surgery. Other roles of a VN described under this Act include, the preparation of animals for anesthesia: this involves the administration of pre-med and analgesia and the intubation of the patient; the collection of samples such as urine, blood, faeces, skin and hair; the taking and developing of X-Rays; and the adjustment of the dose of the anesthetic agent during surgery (Veterinary Surgeons Act 1966). Looking at all these

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